Sea-Fever blog


USS Intrepid: On the Move by Peter A. Mello
September 30, 2008, 10:34 am
Filed under: maritime heritage, storytelling, work

The USS Intrepid is due home (Pier 86 in NYC) this Thursday, October 2nd. Hopefully her trip will be less eventful than her 2005 departure when she ended up making an unscheduled interim port of call about 10 feet off the isle of Manhattan.

It was all closely chronicled below in the videos below from the History Channel’s popular MegaMovers. It’s an inside look at some professional maritime problem solving with some really great footage. Enjoy!

Make sure that you watch MegaMovers on October 17th (11 am or 5 pm) for their Ships on Land episode. 

Welcome home Intrepid!

[YouTube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wcg-PYicLqg]
YouTube – USS Intrepid: On The Move part 1

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Sunday VOWs – Sea Shanties via the Art of Manliness by Peter A. Mello
September 28, 2008, 12:01 am
Filed under: maritime heritage

In this week’s Sunday VOWs (Videos of the Week) we bring your attention to a great post over at The Art of Manliness entitled The 10 Manliest Sea Shanties.

Here’s a couple that come from classic movies but make sure that you visit The Art of Manliness to view all 10 videos and read the great commentary.

[YouTube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c32DJIe2jYU]
YouTube – Moby Dick 1957 – Il Pequod salpa

[YouTube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wn9lsz-71-Q]
YouTube – Master and Commander – Spanish Ladies

[YouTube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CQfBGrfIaMc]
YouTube – Tiburón – Farewell and adieu (V.O.)

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Maritime Metaphors in the Financial "Bailout" by Peter A. Mello
September 27, 2008, 12:05 am
Filed under: life, maritime

I’ve previously written about how nautical language has drifted into our every discourse. (here, here and here)

Well, this week we heard a maritime metaphor of Titanic proportions when, according to Michael Phillips of the Wall Street Journal, Fed Chairman Ben Bernacke was quoted as saying:

Americans must understand that the bailout — itself a maritime metaphor — would help save everyone from rising financial flood waters.

“It’s really a question of saying, ‘There’s a hole in the boat. You did it. Why should I help you?’ ” he said at the Senate hearing. “Well, there’s a hole in our boat. We need to fix it, and then we need to figure out how to make sure it doesn’t happen again.”

Understatement of the Century!

I know these guys are under a lot of pressure but please can’t they come up with something better than a “hole in our boat.”

Any ideas?


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Foto Friday – Last Pictures of the Irish Tall Ship Asgard II by Peter A. Mello
September 26, 2008, 12:55 am
Filed under: FotoFriday, maritime, sail training, tall ships

Med_Asgard digitally enhanced 

Not the usual light fare for Foto Friday but sometimes we need to be reminded that she can be a cruel sea.

These are the last photos of the Irish tall ship Asgard II before she sank in the Bay of Biscay. They were taken by French Customs. Previous post here and here.

std_Asgard II digitally enhanced

Via Sail World


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The History of Whitewater Kayaking by Peter A. Mello
September 25, 2008, 10:08 am
Filed under: maritime heritage, social media, storytelling

YouTube video about the history of white water kayaking. Nice work!

[YouTube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kEy0HoEZ9M4]
YouTube – Whitewater Kayak History

(Via Mr. Boat Blog)

Technorati tags: ,

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"Desperate affairs require desperate measures" Vice Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson by Peter A. Mello
September 25, 2008, 12:01 am
Filed under: maritime heritage

victory1

Lord Nelson probably didn’t envision the future of his flagship when he first uttered that now famous phrase. But that appears to be the case today.

Much of the UK media has recently reported that the Royal Navy is contemplating selling one of the worlds most storied ships and a certified maritime treasure in order to save money.  Every year it costs more than $2 million to maintain her and that’s before taking into consideration any major restoration work. But how can you place a value on an iconic vessel that helped define the strong maritime heritage of this island nation.

One has to wonder if this is just a plea by the Ministry of Defence to find a sugar daddy like the Cutty Sark recently did. For a country with such a wonderful maritime heritage, this seems a little cheesy. Next thing you know, we’ll find her on Craiglist, if not for sale, maybe looking to rent some cabin space?

320 square inches, waterview, furnished (hammock), 799 roommates; will accept any reasonable offers – email to estateagent@royal-navy.mod.uk

Finally, to quote one of our American maritime heros, Oliver Hazzard Perry:

Don’t give up the ship!

Note to Royal Navy: Desperate affairs require avoiding taking stupid measures.

The French and Spanish failed to destroy it – but will funding costs finally sink Nelson’s Victory? Daily Mail (Sept. 12, 2008)

Lord Nelson’s flagship HMS Victory could be put in hands of private company – Telegraph (Sept. 12, 2008)

Navy may hand over Nelson’s flagship to a charity – Times (Sept. 13, 2008)

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ADMIRAL THad Allen – "Social Media, The Way Ahead" by Peter A. Mello
September 24, 2008, 12:03 am
Filed under: maritime, social media

Last month I posted about my new Facebook friend, ADMIRAL Thad Allen.  Today, here he is on YouTube introducing the United States Coast Guard’s Social Media Initiative. (press release)

[YouTube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vdEAY1XLapQ]
YouTube – CG Adm. Thad Allen introduces social media initiative

It doesn’t sound like it’s the same old way of doing business in the Coast Guard anymore. ADMIRAL Allen seems to be turning the old adage that “information is power” on it’s head.

Again, I find this remarkable for a government agency/military leader to take this kind of risk. He get’s it.

Kudo’s to ADMIRAL Allen and his CG leadership team!

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On A Boat In Upper Galveston Bay in the Middle of Hurricane Ike by Peter A. Mello
September 22, 2008, 9:48 am
Filed under: Experience, life, maritime, reality tv, social media, work

Without comment.

[YouTube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a0csM7lC0mc]
YouTube – On a boat in the middle of Hurricane Ike

[YouTube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ovlEyH6VK3U]
YouTube – Hurricane Ike hit a crew of 4 in Galveston Bay

R/V Odyssey

Odyssey

As always, you can find more of this great stuff posted by Fred for Maritime Monday over at gCaptain.com.


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Monday Morning Motivator – Motivation Never Sleeps by Peter A. Mello
September 22, 2008, 12:01 am
Filed under: life

You don’t have to play golf or even be a golf fan to enjoy watching the Ryder Cup. The competition between the United States and Europe is full of drama and this weekend was no exception. One would have thought that a Tigerless team would not stand a chance in wrestling the Cup away from the Europeans, but we did. Of course there could be many reasons contributing to this but one has to wonder if the US team came together as a more effective (=winning) team without their iconic golfer.

In any case, this Citibank ad caught my attention because I think it does a great job in capturing the off the course preparation and pressure that builds before the first ball is even teed up.  I also think that it translates well into other areas of life. What do you think?

[YouTube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AMubRmKZ1n4]
YouTube – Citi Never Sleeps: Golf

Congratulations to Paul Azinger and the entire US Ryder Cup Team.

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70th Anniversary of the Great New England Hurricane of 1938 by Peter A. Mello
September 21, 2008, 9:46 pm
Filed under: life, maritime art, maritime heritage

 1938 hurricane - NB Standard Times If you are a baby-boomer like me who grew up in Southeastern New England like me, the 1938 hurricane is the stuff of legend. While many of our parents experienced this storm first hand, they were probably very young. But our grandparents, aunts and uncles and family elders told the stories that would leave an impression on a young child for a lifetime.

Today marks the 70th anniversary of “a wind that shook the world.” It was a monster hurricane that arrived unannounced and hastily. It came at a time when television had not yet become a household appliance and weather reporting was more about yesterday than tomorrow and beyond. Needless to say, people were not prepared and the storm exacted its toll.

Steve Urbon wrote a great piece entitled Remembering a Killer for today’s New Bedford Standard Times commemorating this devastating event for our area’s communities. While many of those who have experienced it first hand have passed on, they were able to get a few locals to tell their stories that are definitely worth reading. They also have a video with the Westport Historical Society which is worth watching but unfortunately it loaded very slowly for me. 

[YouTube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jN59fcdrd1M]
YouTube – Westport and the Hurricane of ’38

The following newsreel does a great job in capturing the devastation, especially in downtown Providence, RI where the storm surge up Narragansett Bay brought more that 13 feet of water at such a rapid rate that some believed it to be a tidal wave.

[YouTube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RA-3zULhCvM]
YouTube – 1938 Hurricane

Finally, its sad and a bit troubling that the recent hurricane that struck Texas and has left so many homeless in Galveston, was eclipsed in the media last week by the man-made storm that struck Wall Street.


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