Sea-Fever blog


With my luck I’d get shipwrecked on a desert island with her… by Peter A. Mello
January 27, 2011, 9:10 pm
Filed under: life | Tags:

Artist/Musician: Lykke Li



Night surfing with Mark Visser by Peter A. Mello
January 26, 2011, 10:58 am
Filed under: life | Tags: ,

Just watch. You’ll get the awesomeness of it.

via The Scuttlefish



Finally, a website for lonely sailors! by Peter A. Mello
January 25, 2011, 4:31 pm
Filed under: life, social media | Tags:

sea captain date

I’m sure there won’t be a dry eye in the room after watching this video. Oh, the internet is a wonderful thing!

SeaCaptainDate.com

More here.



Moby-Monday: Finding Melville’s Whale by Peter A. Mello
January 24, 2011, 9:49 am
Filed under: Moby-Monday | Tags: , , ,

The crew over at Southern Fried Science are mixing art and science with “a year-long series exploring Herman Melville’s classic novel, Moby Dick, from the perspective of modern marine scientists.” More from their website:

Each chapter will be posted with a brief summary, in verse and discussion will take place in the comment thread. Generally, new chapters will be posted every Tuesday and Thursday, with some Sundays. I’m reading from the Oxford World’s Classic edition of Moby Dick, but any unabridged copy will do. The websitePower Moby Dick hosts a complete, unabridged, and fully annotated version online. We will keep a running list of the posts made or this project here so that they are easy to find.

Everyone is welcome to read along and encouraged to participate in the discussion.

The introduction to this project can be found here:Finding Melville’s Whale

Hmmm…two things I was never very good at in high school: (1) finishing Moby-Dick and (2) anything science related. But I’m a different person today. :) So I’m considering this my own personal Nantucket sleigh ride of art and science education. Hop aboard!



FotoFriday: Mindrelic ‘New York City Timelapse’ Video by Peter A. Mello
January 21, 2011, 3:46 pm
Filed under: FotoFriday, photography | Tags: , ,

Got to love great timelapse photography of NYC; especially how this one gently glides. Awesome!


Mindrelic ‘New York City Timelapse’ Video, posted with vodpod

 



FotoFriday: Little People – A tiny street art project by Peter A. Mello
January 14, 2011, 11:44 am
Filed under: FotoFriday, photography, storytelling | Tags: , , , ,

Small Victory - A tiny street art project

I love these Little People – Tiny Street Art Project photos! This one’s called Small Victory.

Click through here to see the real story behind this picture.

Also check out Slinkachu, the artist’s website.

Via Sea-Fever Pacific correspondent @MiaChambers



Dock-u-mentaries: Films about the Working Waterfront by Peter A. Mello

Dock-u-mentaries

New Bedford’s Working Waterfront Festival recently announced an interesting new program: Dock-U-Mentaries, a monthly film series presented in conjunction with New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park. (download PDF flyer)

Films will be presented free of charge at 7pm on the third Friday of each month at the Corson Maritime Learning Center (33 William Street) in downtown New Bedford.

The first program takes place on Friday, January 21st featuring:

  • Pearl of the Atlantic – a 1960s era film produced by the New Bedford Seafood Council to promote scallops AND
  • A narrated slide show of the contemporary Port of New Bedford and its workers, presented by photographer Phil Mello.

Working Waterfront Festival and National Park team up for Dock-U-Mentaries – New Bedford Standard Times – Jan. 10, 2011



Moby-Monday: A Whale of a Weekend! (#mdm15) by Peter A. Mello

Moby-Monday is back and inspired by an extraordinary event organized by the New Bedford Whaling Museum. From all accounts the 15th Annual Moby-Dick Marathon was a great success!

I took my seven-year old son Luke to the Seamen’s Bethel on Saturday for Chapters 7 (The Chapel), 8 (The Pulpit) and 9 (The Sermon). Since I am on the Board of Managers of the New Bedford Port Society I am obviously biased, but there is no better place to experience a Moby-Dick reading than the place where Melville actually worshiped.  Here are a few pictures and a video from that experience.

Seamen's Bethel prior to 15th Annual Moby-Dick Marathon

The Sermon in the Seamen's Bethel, Moby-Dick Marathon

After taking this in, the tide of Moby-Dick enthusiasts carried us across the street to the Jacob’s Family Gallery in the Whaling Museum, the home port of the Moby-Dick Marathon, where there was a full house and lots of great energy.

Jacobs Family Gallery, New Bedford Whaling Museum, Moby-Dick Marathon

On Sunday mornings, we typically listen to classical music but this week we tuned into the livestream of the event. While listening Luke was hard at work in the corner with his carpenter’s kit and by mid-morning he had built a whaleship for my office! The extraordinary convergence and power of great art and new technology in action inspiring a young boy to dream and create!

Thanks and congratulations to the New Bedford Whaling Museum for putting on a great show! Using the livestream and an active Twitter feed, people were able to enjoy the experience without actually having to be present. Of course, there is no substitute for being there in body, soul and spirit. The New Bedford Whaling Museum is an extraordinary small museum that keep getting better. I’m already looking forward to the 16th Annual Moby-Dick Marathon!



New Bedford Whaling Museum’s 15th Moby-Dick Marathon by Peter A. Mello

Some might think that reading Moby-Dick is like running a marathon. Well, this weekend reading Moby-Dick actually is a marathon event at the New Bedford Whaling Museum which is hosting it’s 15th year celebrating Melville’s American classic.

Moby-Dick Marathon poster

Beth Perdue wrote a great article in today’s Coastin’ section of the New Bedford Standard Times about what you can expect which includes the below highlights so that you can chart your experience. Standing Watch – A marathon timeline (times are approximate)

Chapter 1-6, Noon, Saturday

These first few chapters are entertaining for several reasons, including the comical treatment Melville gives to the relationship of Ishmael and Queequeg and the rare and intriguing look at the city of New Bedford as seen through Melville’s 19th-century eyes. And, this year, the Whaling Museum returns the reading’s kickoff to the Lagoda, its 89-foot, half-scale whaleship replica, adding a new layer of atmosphere to the reading.

Chapter 7-9: Seamen’s Bethel and Father Mapple sermon, 1:20 p.m.

Being in the Bethel, the inspiration for this scene, is reason enough to make the trip up Johnny Cake Hill to hear the famous sermon by Father Mapple. The sermon, full of fire and brimstone and delivered with passion for the past few years by Rev. Dr. Edward R. Dufresne, is another great reason. If that’s not enough, the hymn (from the 1956 film) that kicks off the sermon will be sung by Joanna McQuillan Weeks, local choir singer and secretary of the Ladies’ Branch of the New Bedford Port Society.

Chapter 32: “Cetology,” 6:20 p.m.

This look at the scientific classification of whales is a “love it or hate it” kind of chapter with many votes landing in the latter category. In reality, Melville scholar Dr. Laurie Robertson-Lorant said, for those willing to dive in, the chapter can be very funny. “It’s hilarious because what’s he doing is deconstructing scientific classification,” said Robertson-Lorant. “He’s poking fun at this idea that now we have everything nailed down because we can make a chart.”

Chapter 40: “Midnight Forecastle” 7:45 p.m.

Written in theatrical style, this is an annual favorite among marathoners and this year promises to be extra special with the debut of Culture*Park, the New Bedford theater ensemble, to the mix. About 10 actors will perform the section which shows the ship’s watch, made up of representatives from many countries and cultures, eyeing a coming storm.

Chapter 69: “The Funeral,” 1:30 a.m. Sunday

Melville isn’t pulling punches with this powerful look at the 19th-century industry’s brutal treatment of whales. A key image here is the floating white mass of the whale’s corpse, according to “Moby-Dick” scholar and literature professor Robert Wallace, who called it one of the strongest ecological images in 19th-century literature.

Chapter 78: “Cistern and Buckets,” 3 a.m.

A short comic chapter showing Tashtego falling into a gutted whale carcass and then into the sea, only to be rescued by Queequeg. “It has what Melville calls ‘unspeakable horror’ as well as redemption and wry humor,” said Melville expert Mary K. Bercaw Edwards.

Chapter 81: “The Pequod Meets the Virgin,” 3:30 a.m.

A good example of the fun Melville managed to work into his tragedy, this chapter combines high nationalistic comedy — spoofing the futility of the German whalers — with deep Shakespearean tragedy — in the Pequod’s unnecessary cruelty to the old, blind, wounded bull whale, according to Wallace.

Chapter 87: “The Grand Armada,” 5 a.m.

In this chapter, the whaleboat enters a circle of mother whales and calves. Scholars say for all the novel’s focus on Ahab’s obsession, the whale is the book’s central figure and this chapter is its spiritual center. “Ishmael’s vision of the baby whale in the heart of the carnage “» is the spiritual touchstone for the entire book,” said Wallace.

Chapter 93: “The Castaway,” 6:10 a.m.

The beauty of Melville’s language, noted again and again in conversations about “Moby-Dick” is especially evident in this chapter about Pip going overboard and being dragged down into the depths of the sea, according to Robertson-Lorant.

Chapter 99: “The Doubloon,” 7 a.m.

A dramatic reading where Ahab nails a doubloon to the mast and each of the whaler’s crew members interprets its meaning, each according to their subjective view point, said Robertson-Lorant.

Chapter 110: “Queequeg in His Coffin,” 9 a.m.

“The fact that Queequeg cannot interpret the tattooing on his own chest even though his own heart beats against it is a lesson for us all,” said Wallace. “The dialogue between him and Pip in this chapter is unbearably poignant.”

Chapters 133-135: “The Chase,” 11:45 a.m.

The novel ends with an action-packed bang in these final chapters when Moby-Dick appears and the whalers begin their chase in earnest. “They’re chasing Moby-Dick, knowing that they’re doomed,” said Robertson-Lorant. “The language is so dramatic. The description of fear is the best there is.”

Want to experience things like Melville did as he prepared for his journey on the whaleship Acushnet, cross the street and step into the Seamen’s Bethel (aka Whalemen’s Chapel) where Father Mapple’s sermon will be delivered. Here’s a taste:

I’m proud to be a member of the Board of Managers of the New Bedford Port Society which is the organization that owns and manages the Bethel and the historic Mariner’s Home next door.  We are currently underway on a major restoration and preservation project and if you are interested in learning more and/or supporting this effort, please email me.  If you need or know someone who needs a new website or some digital marketing help, Sea-Fever Consulting’s digitsimple program will donate 25% of all revenues generated from new projects from now until the end of February 2011 that use the code SEAMENSBETHEL. More about our Good Neighbor Program can be found at digitsimple.

Back to the marathon.

  • The majority of the event will take place in the beautiful, newly renovated Bourne Building, the homeport of the Lagoda, the largest ship model in the world.
  • Can’t sail over to New Bedford for this happening? You can still experience it via the web. The Whaling Museum say they will be live-streaming the event via their website.
  • It’s doubtful that this event will conjure up the appearance of another white whale, but you can follow the event on Twitter via the hashtag #mdm15.
  • Think you know a lot about Moby-Dick? There’s a fun sounding Stump the Scholar’s quiz game with Melville Society experts matching wits. The free public program is patterned after National Public Radio’s popular show, “Wait, wait, don’t tell me.” No questions will be deemed too tough and prizes will be awarded. (10:00 am Saturday, January 8, 2011 in the Whaling Museum’s Cook Memorial Theater.

It sound’s like a whale of a weekend! Sea you there!




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