Sea-Fever blog


The Old Man and the Sea by Peter A. Mello
October 6, 2012, 3:36 pm
Filed under: life, maritime heritage, new media | Tags: ,

Here’s a great stop animation drawing and effective visual storytelling of a piece American classic literature, The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway.



Not your little sister’s Ford Fiesta! by Peter A. Mello
October 2, 2012, 10:32 pm
Filed under: life, new media, social media

Check out the barge scenes!

[Professional driver, do not attempt in your city]

Flag dip to Todd Lappin, Telestar Logistic via Twitter



Moby Monday — A Farewell Fit for a Cannibal by MegDC
March 29, 2010, 8:47 am
Filed under: Book review, Moby-Monday, new media | Tags: , , ,


It’s SkyMall’s moment. On the heels of Nina Katchadourian’s infectious "Sky Mall Kitties," a tribute in song, comes new attention to the 2006 parody book SkyMaul: Happy Crap You Can Buy From a Plane. Among the book’s pages of “Reality-Cancelling Headphones” and “Adultery Detectors” you’ll find the "Moby-Dick Hamster Coffin, a “hand-carved mini-coffin” designed to give your fluffy friend the burial-at-sea he deserves—or the life-buoy he so desperately needs.

Margaret Guroff is the editor and publisher of Power Moby-Dick.



Moby Monday — Moby-Dick, the Video Game? by MegDC
January 18, 2010, 9:41 am
Filed under: Moby-Monday, new media | Tags: , , , ,

This thing (a mock cover for Moby-Dick, “the literary classic that inspired the epic video game”) reminds me of this thing (a T-shirt featuring a mock screen from an “Ahab vs Dick” video game) and this thing (a mock announcement of a Wii Moby-Dick game) and, sadly, this thing (an essay about why there may never actually be a Moby-Dick video game.) Sigh.

Margaret Guroff is the editor and publisher of Power Moby-Dick.



Moby Monday — Crowdsourcing Emoji-Dick by MegDC
September 21, 2009, 9:30 am
Filed under: maritime, Moby-Monday, new media, social media, storytelling | Tags: , , ,

Next stop: Klingon
Emoticons are fine as far as they go, but they do not express the whole range of human experience—our hopes, our dreams, our heartbreaks; our recycling, our maple leaves, our bananas. For that, you need emoji, which are Japanese emoticons for people with a lot of stuff to express (and maybe a lot of time on their hands).

In fact, emoji are now used by Japanese texters as a form of written language. This gave Fred Benenson an idea. The product manager at Creative Commons decided to have a book translated entirely into emoji, using the micro-contracting site Mechanical Turk for labor and the micro-funding site Kickstarter for scratch. But for a translation subject, he went decidedly macro: with enough backing, Benenson plans to produce a translation of Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick, the English language’s premier text on recycling, maple leaves, and bananas.

Benenson estimates the cost of translating Melville’s 1851 novel at $3,500 and is currently seeking pledges of $5 to $200. If enough backers sign on by October 19, their donations will be accepted and work will proceed. In the end, supporters will receive benefits based on their investments. Five-dollar backers will get a PDF file of the final product, while $200 backers will receive a color, hardcover limited edition Emoji-Dick book, numbered and signed “by the author.” Wonder how Benenson is going to swing that one?

Margaret Guroff is the editor and publisher of Power Moby-Dick.



Moby Monday — The Saga Continues by MegDC

"Hast seen the white whale?"I’ve envisioned William Hurt as Ahab ever since I saw him in Kiss of the Spider Woman. And now that vision is realized: German production company TMG just announced that its upcoming Moby-Dick miniseries stars Hurt as Ahab and Ethan Hawke as Starbuck. Filming begins shortly in Nova Scotia—where one boatbuilder got the contract for six replica whaleboats—and Malta, where a tall ship has been cast to play the Pequod.

So far, that production sounds fairly faithful to the text; if you’re looking for “Moby Dick as Frankenstein” and whalers who can fly, you’ll have to wait for the planned Moby-Dick action film by Wanted director Timur Bekmambetov.

Then again, if you’re really patient and you really want a break from that tired old storyline, check out this hilarious script for the trailer for Moby-Dick: Ahab’s Revenge, by a blogger called tpalumbi. The film—which, strangely, has not yet been optioned—is envisioned to star Shia LaBeouf as Ishmael, Kate Hudson as his love interest, The Rock as Queequeg, and Jason Statham (known for starring in Guy Ritchie films) as as an Ahab with four steam-powered legs. Well, you know, if you can’t get William Hurt …

Margaret Guroff is the editor and publisher of Power Moby-Dick.

Photo via MSN Movies.



Moby Monday — (Whale) Killer iPhone App by MegDC
September 7, 2009, 9:30 am
Filed under: maritime, Moby-Monday, new media | Tags: , , ,

Shake for giant kraken

Speaking of iPhone apps, what would your Moby-Dick application look like? The iTunes store offers a few downloadable versions of the text (though, sadly, no annotated version yet) as well as audiobooks, musical recordings, a schweet study guide by Shmoop, and the whole 1956 film starring Gregory Peck … but no app that really brings the book to life in a new, iPhone-specific way.

Anna Leach of the blog Shiny Shiny proposes one such app: a simple whale-locator service that would identify any nearby whales and take you to their blogs (or, we’d add, their Twitter feeds).

Some friends and I had a different idea: a Moby-Dick video game. Blogger Matthew Wasteland has previously laid out the inherent problem with such a product. If you allow for alternate endings to Ahab’s quest, have you leached out of your game all the greatness of the novel?

That’s what makes our Moby-Dick game app idea so brilliant (if we do say so ourselves). It’s mainly just a view of the sea—sometimes calm, sometimes stormy, throw in a little St. Elmo’s fire now and again—and you only ever see the white whale after you’ve been playing nonstop for … what, hours? months? It’s theoretically possible to harpoon the sucker, but by the time you get a chance to do it, you’ll be begging for Ahab’s (virtual) fate.

Anyway, that’s our concept. If you have a better one, let’s hear it in the comments.

Margaret Guroff is the editor and publisher of Power Moby-Dick.




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