Sea-Fever blog


AMVER remembering the Titanic by Peter A. Mello
April 15, 2010, 8:55 am
Filed under: maritime heritage, social media | Tags: , ,

For those who may not know AMVER (Automated Mutual Vessel Assistance Vessel Rescue System), it’s a unit of the United States Coast Guard that focuses on maritime safety and particularly rescues at sea. They also lead the way in using social media in the maritime world and government sector.

On the anniversary of the Titanic sinking, AMVER had a remarkable post on their blog which is a must maritime read. It included the this video.



Hear to Help! UNICEF’s Tap Project Radio by Peter A. Mello
March 25, 2010, 7:23 pm
Filed under: Leadership, life, social media | Tags: , , ,

Awesome indie web radio for a great, important cause. Only up for one week so tune in before it runs dry. And of course, donate!

Flag dip to brainpicker on Twitter



Live Coverage of Tsunami from Hawaii by Peter A. Mello
February 27, 2010, 3:05 pm
Filed under: maritime, Oceans, social media | Tags: ,



There’s Nothing Funny About Safety at Sea! Well, Almost Nothing… by Peter A. Mello
November 28, 2009, 10:19 am
Filed under: maritime, social media | Tags: , ,

scuttlebutt30

Parody is the sincerest form of flattery and the above Scuttlebutt cartoon by Barb Patton captures the spirit of the social media work Ben Strong and Bev Howard do at AMVER (website/blog).

The US Coast Guard is doing a great job experimenting with social media and nobody does it better than AMVER’s Ben and Bev. They, along with a few other Guardians organized the USCG’s 1st Annual (?) PodCamp a few weeks ago and it was a great success. Here’s a link to my post about 5 highlights of the event.

Ben was recently interviewed on Marketing Over Coffee, one of the top social media podcasts, and you can listen to it here.

The USCG is fortunate to have Admiral Thad Allen, a leader who understands the importance of social media as a communication tool, at the helm. Listen to my Weekly Leader podcast episode 5 to hear Admiral Allen talk about leadership and social media.

Thanks Admiral Allen and AMVER for charting a course demonstrating how social media can be used effectively in a large organization and across the maritime industry!



So you wanna be a PodStar? by Peter A. Mello
November 21, 2009, 10:58 pm
Filed under: social media | Tags: , , ,

So you’ve dreamed of the fame, riches and adoration of being a PodStar.   Just send $49.95 $39.95 $19.95 $1.99 nothing to me and watch this video. I guarantee success or your money back. I can also help you get thousands of new Twitter followers every day too! ;-)

(screencast of my presentation for the great 2009 USCG PodCamp – warning 30+ minutes – best viewed full screen and HD)

Update September 26, 2010

Here are slides from my presentation at Podcamp Boston 5.

Check out these podcasts from from podcasters that participated in my session:



Moby Monday — Crowdsourcing Emoji-Dick by MegDC
September 21, 2009, 9:30 am
Filed under: maritime, Moby-Monday, new media, social media, storytelling | Tags: , , ,

Next stop: Klingon
Emoticons are fine as far as they go, but they do not express the whole range of human experience—our hopes, our dreams, our heartbreaks; our recycling, our maple leaves, our bananas. For that, you need emoji, which are Japanese emoticons for people with a lot of stuff to express (and maybe a lot of time on their hands).

In fact, emoji are now used by Japanese texters as a form of written language. This gave Fred Benenson an idea. The product manager at Creative Commons decided to have a book translated entirely into emoji, using the micro-contracting site Mechanical Turk for labor and the micro-funding site Kickstarter for scratch. But for a translation subject, he went decidedly macro: with enough backing, Benenson plans to produce a translation of Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick, the English language’s premier text on recycling, maple leaves, and bananas.

Benenson estimates the cost of translating Melville’s 1851 novel at $3,500 and is currently seeking pledges of $5 to $200. If enough backers sign on by October 19, their donations will be accepted and work will proceed. In the end, supporters will receive benefits based on their investments. Five-dollar backers will get a PDF file of the final product, while $200 backers will receive a color, hardcover limited edition Emoji-Dick book, numbered and signed “by the author.” Wonder how Benenson is going to swing that one?

Margaret Guroff is the editor and publisher of Power Moby-Dick.



Moby Monday — Ishmael Tweets You Back by MegDC

Your new pen-pal?
First came Moby-Dick as a Twitter feed. Then came a newspaper piece that reimagined the novel as a series of tweets from its narrator, Ishmael: “We’re all having a ‘whale of a time’ here! (That’s right, I WENT THERE. Sue me!)”

Last week, Thomas Watson of New Orleans went all 2.0 on the concept with TweetMeIshmael, a Twitter feed in Ishmael’s 19th-century voice. Not only does this Ishmael note his key observations as tweets, but he responds in character to Twitter users who @reply to him (by typing “@TweetMeIshmael” at the beginning of a post). Here’s a convo about Chapter 16:

TweetMeIshmael Yojo, Q’s little black god, has tasked me with finding a whaleship. Three suitable ships in harbor: Devil-Dam, Tit-Bit, and Pequod.

jmsullivan @TweetMeIshmael Go with Tit-Bit! Tit-Bit! Come on, how can that not be a fun ship?

TweetMeIshmael Laughing aloud! RT @jmsullivan “Go with Tit-Bit! Tit-Bit! Come on, how can that not be a fun ship?”

TweetMeIshmael Learned a/b Pequod: owners (Peleg, Bildad); captain (pegleg Ahab)

jmsullivan @TweetMeIshmael Pretty sure those are names of Assyrian demons. Would be _very_ wary of this ship. Sounds ominous. What was wrong w Tit Bit?

TweetMeIshmael @jmsullivan Then Yojo shall have some company. re Tit-Bit: Its seaworthiness concerned me. What chance has a tit-bit against a spermaceti?

Watson, who is reading the book on his Blackberry, first thought of the feed as a way to take notes on author Herman Melville’s turns of phrase. Surprisingly, this will be his first time through the book—if he makes it through. Watson read part of the long, dense narrative during one summer vacation and always intended to finish, but it wasn’t until he picked up Nathaniel Philbrick’s nonfiction masterpiece In the Heart of the Sea recently that he felt ready. Philbrick’s gloss on the lives of Nantucket whalers “filled in a lot of the gaps I’d had,” Watson writes. “If I were a teacher, I’d make In the Heart of the Sea required reading before Moby-Dick.”

At press time, 30 Twitter users were following TweetMeIshmael. Watson plans to post at least one tweet for each of the book’s 135 chapters, though he may post more as time and inspiration allow. “If this little project helps me finish Moby-Dick, I’ll consider it a success,” he writes. “If a few dozen people enjoy Ishmael’s missives in their Twitter feed, so much the better!”

Margaret Guroff is editor and publisher of Power Moby-Dick. She tweets about artistic responses to Moby-Dick at twitter.com/powermobydick.



Herman Melville, social media and saving lives at sea by Peter A. Mello
August 19, 2009, 2:27 pm
Filed under: maritime, social media | Tags: , , ,

Well I’m not sure how I missed this video but surprises are good and this one made my day today. :-)

Link to the Amver post with the Herman Melville passage mentioned above.

Ben Strong leads the US Coast Guard’s Amver (Automated Mutual Assistance Vessel Rescue System) unit.  Amver has been saving lives since 1958 and their blog tells their great story. Make sure you check it out.

I interviewed Ben about Amver and other topics on Messing About In Ships podcast episode 36 ; make sure you listen to this too.

Not only does Ben lead Amver but he’s also on the leading edge of using social media in the maritime world and government sector. The above video is a great example of how Ben experiments with new communication tools. This must make his ultimate boss happy because when I interviewed USCG Commandant Admiral Thad Allen for the Weekly Leader podcast episode 5 he shared his thoughts about the United States Coast Guard’s commitment to using new technology in advancing their mission.

So, thanks Ben for the kind words about the Sea-Fever blog and the leadership work we do and Happy Belated Birthday to Herman Melville!



Hunting Hurricanes with Traditional and Social Media by Peter A. Mello
August 18, 2009, 10:37 am
Filed under: maritime, social media | Tags: , ,

Stormpulse

Mashable’s Barb Dybwad recently wrote a pretty comprehensive post broken into sections for web-based resources, Twitter-specific sources and mobile hurricane tracking and descriptively titled Hurricane Bill: How to Track it Online.

Of course, there’s always NOAA’s National Weather Service’s info packed Hurricane Tracking Center as well.

Report via Sea-Fever Twittersphere Correspondent Mia Chambers.



Moby Monday — Call Me Ish-Meow by MegDC

The whale-riding scene has been cut from most editionsFans of LOLCats—the barely literate, photo-caption-writing felines of I Can Has Cheezburger—will enjoy a new edition of Moby-Dick compiled by blogger Debra at She Who Seeks. Using other people’s LOLCats images, Debra presents a clever four-panel version of the story. One quibble: the condensation omits the book’s cetology material completely. (Or maybe that’s a good thing?)

The Internet is surprisingly light on LOLWhales, but they do exist. Here’s one of a whale defying gravity—and apologizing for it. The spelling is particularly atrocious … but then, it’s not a sperm whale, so what do you expect?

Visitors to the Cheezburger site can upload images and write their own captions for free. Just an FYI, in case you have an LOLMobyDick inside you, dying to come out.

•••

Good work, Team Whale. After trailing Black Beauty during much of the 45-day polling period, Moby Dick surged ahead to win the Guardian (UK) online vote for “best performance by an animal” in a work of classic literature.

The final score was 35.2% for Moby Dick to 33.3% for Black Beauty, with Buck from The Call of the Wild, the bear from A Winter’s Tale, and Jip from David Copperfield trailing far behind. Victory is sweet!

Margaret Guroff is the editor and publisher of Power Moby-Dick.




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