Sea-Fever blog

Sad Day: Loss of the HMS Bounty and two of her professional mariners by Peter A. Mello

Early this morning news broke that the HMS Bounty was caught in Hurricane Sandy on her trip south and foundered in heavy weather. Fourteen of her 16 crew members were able to make it into life rafts and were ultimately rescued by the US Coast Guard. Here is an incredible video of this operation.

This is a sobering reminder of the incredible dangers of going to sea. There have been so many tragic losses of tall ships and sail training professionals over the past decade and it’s difficult to process a loss like this. Not enough is known about what transpired about the Bounty in her final moments but two experienced captains have weighed in wondering why the ship ever took to sea in advance of a storm like Sandy. Local captain baffled by HMS Bounty accident and Picton Castle captain questions Bounty being at sea during storm.

So our thoughts and prayers go out to the families of Claudene Christian who died today and Captain Robin Walbridge who is still missing as I write this post.

Finally, the sad news is somewhat offset by the good news that we still have real life heroes today. US Coast rescue swimmers risk it all, accomplishing incomprehensible feats under mind-boggling conditions.  While everyone else is advised to stay out of harms way, they are willing to jump into it save lives. They are true heroes and we can’t thank them enough for what they do, all in a days work.


“If we don’t do anything, it will be forgotten” by Peter A. Mello
October 25, 2012, 10:39 pm
Filed under: life, maritime, maritime heritage | Tags: , ,

Seventy five years since his last visit, Samuel Nevins tours the Charles W. Morgan being restored in Mystic Seaport.

My favorite line: “Without a comfortable wife, you don’t have a life.”

Google Doodle Celebrates Moby-Dick’s 161st Berthday Plus Listen to the Big Read! by Peter A. Mello



We love Moby-Dick at Sea-Fever so it was fun to stumble upon Google’s Doodle celebrating the 161st birthday of it’s publication in England. We can celebrate again next month because it was published in the US on November 14, 1851!

As a present to Sea-Fever readers, here’s the 1st chapter of the Moby-Dick Big Read. Here’s what’s that’s all about:

…an online version of Melville’s magisterial tome: each of its 135 chapters read out aloud, by a mixture of the celebrated and the unknown, to be broadcast online in a sequence of 135 downloads, publicly and freely accessible.

They started posting a chapter a day on Sept. 16, 2012. Tilda Swinton spins an awesome yarn in Chapter 1 – Loomings. There are many other interesting readers and the artwork on the website is definitely worth a visit.

Of course, if you need any help deciphering Melville’s lexicon, there’s no better place to go than Meg Guroff’s awesome PowerMobyDick website.


The Old Man and the Sea by Peter A. Mello
October 6, 2012, 3:36 pm
Filed under: life, maritime heritage, new media | Tags: ,

Here’s a great stop animation drawing and effective visual storytelling of a piece American classic literature, The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway.

Combining two of my life long dreams: Hot Tug! by Peter A. Mello
October 5, 2012, 10:06 pm
Filed under: life, maritime | Tags: , ,


Growing up I dreamed of being a tug boat captain. Now I dream of lounging around in a hot tub. Maybe someday I can combine both of my dreams. Look for me in Mattapoisett Harbor!

Check out Hot Tug’s website.


Not your little sister’s Ford Fiesta! by Peter A. Mello
October 2, 2012, 10:32 pm
Filed under: life, new media, social media

Check out the barge scenes!

[Professional driver, do not attempt in your city]

Flag dip to Todd Lappin, Telestar Logistic via Twitter

Ghost of the Titanic? by Peter A. Mello
April 15, 2012, 10:22 pm
Filed under: life, maritime, maritime art, maritime heritage

Today marks the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic. Here’s an amazing image by Swiss light artist Gerry Hofstetter projected onto an iceberg.


Closer to home, this plaque is affixed to the side of a house across the street from where we live.


Francis Davis Millet was an extraordinary man. Here’s his entry on Encyclopedia Titanica.


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