Sea-Fever blog


The Restoration and Reconstruction of Verbeeck’s Battle by Peter A. Mello
July 24, 2011, 1:08 pm
Filed under: maritime art | Tags: , , ,

Interesting video of the restoration and reconstruction of an amazing maritime painting at the National Gallery.



Moby-Monday: “It is not down in any map; true places never are.” by Peter A. Mello

Jeremy Wood is a multidiscipline artist and map maker whose diverse work offers people and places a playground of space and time. In October 2000 he began to explore GPS satellite technology as a tool for digital mark making on water, over land, and in the air. He makes drawings and maps of his movements by recording all his daily journeys with GPS to create a personal cartography. (from the artist’s website)

One of Wood’s projects included a walk though London along the quote: “It is not down in any map; true places never are.” Herman Melville, Moby Dick.

Jeremy Wood drawing

Also from the artist’s website.

The text was written over a period of three months from January 2005. The length of the line recorded on foot for the drawing was 44.2 miles, and the total distance traveled to make the drawing was 458.6 miles. I had two bicycle punctures with reinforced puncture resistant tires, the first of which happened 20 miles into a journey looking for locations that ended in having to push the bike home for 9 miles. After closing the body of the last letter, I headed as far north as the land allowed to a small pier on which the Greenwich Meridian is marked, and finished the drawing by circling around on the footpath at the edge of the River Thames for a full stop.

Via PowerMobyDick where you can find lots of other interesting Moby-Dick digital ephemera.



Shiver me timbers! Not All Tallships people like sea shanties! by Peter A. Mello
November 29, 2009, 8:33 pm
Filed under: maritime art, maritime heritage | Tags: , ,

That’s according to a short sea story told by Bowsprite, one of the most amazing ports of call on the Internet. Please do yourself a favor and check out this maritime treasure.

drawing by Bowsprite



Ocean Obsessions and Love Lines by Peter A. Mello
October 6, 2009, 9:54 am
Filed under: maritime art | Tags: , ,

I’ve chronicled more than a few obsessions on Sea-Fever over the years and it could be argued that this blog is itself a bit of an obsession.  A couple of posts that immediately come to mind are 15 years and 4 million matchsticks and The Germans are coming! The Germans are coming! (by pickup and trailer) but there are literally hundreds more.

Joy-at-Open-Studios-100409

I look forward to every year at this time because artists in New Bedford open their studios to the public and you can explore and discover some amazing things like Huguette Despault May’s awesome, very large charcoal drawings of maritime rope. In fact, her obsession is drawing the same piece of line, an old worn hawser, over and over and over from different perspectives. I believe that there are currently 12 different drawings which have also been turned into beautiful prints.

I wrote about May’s work last year and was excited to return again this year because there is really no substitute for experiencing it in person. If you are ever in the New Bedford area, try to see her work and studio, you won’t be disappointed. (Her contact info is on her website.)

Click on this image to open a larger version in Flickr

If you spend any time with the artist you’ll see just how passionate and focused she is on this single piece of line. (NB: the above gigantic drawing with Joy standing in front is called Titular Head (2006) and was from a separate series the artist did for her MFA thesis for Tufts/School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)(Larger version of photograph of the the artist’s studio)

Obsessions are good! Right Tugster, Never Sea Land (mermaids) and PowerMobyDick?



FotoFriday: Jenny Holzer’s “Wave T” by Peter A. Mello
August 21, 2009, 10:00 am
Filed under: FotoFriday, maritime art | Tags: , , , , ,

Jenny Holzer "Wave T" NY Times Style Magazine - Women's Fashion Fall 2009

Last Sunday the NY Times celebrated the 5th Anniversary Issue of it’s Style Magazine with the above image on the cover. Look closely and you’ll see the sea.

The cover was created by one of the art world’s most successful contemporary artists, Jenny Holzer. In reality the image was an art mashup with Holzer finding Cobalt123’s original image on Flickr. Here’s the story.

Holzer is an American conceptual art whose medium is language, or more precisely words. She uses words in all kinds of locations and ways including recently projecting them onto water like the below image from her interesting Projections website.

Jenny Holzer: Site: Tuxedo Princess, Gateshead, United Kingdom; October 27, 2000; Text: Lustmord - 1993-1995; Projection: Charles Paserelli; Photo: Attilio Maranzano

Here’s a video from Holzer’s recent show, Protect Protect, at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York.

[YouTube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8iHvW3JRQpY]
YouTube – Whitney Focus presents Jenny Holzer: PROTECT PROTECT



FotoFriday: Fred LeBlanc’s Windjammers Downeast by Peter A. Mello

Earlier this week I received a copy of Fred LeBlanc’s new mini-coffee table book, Windjammers Downeast as well as an accompanying set of beautiful photo postcards.

I met Fred when I was at the American Sail Training Association where he was always extremely generous with his images. He’s dedicated his work to helping promote this very unique fleet of tall ships that sail along the beautiful Maine coast.

So next time you are heading over to someone’s house for a summer dinner, you might want to skip the predictable bottle of wine and cut flowers and present them a copy of Windjammers Downeast; especially if they’re sailors or just love the sea. It’s about the same price and it’ll bring enjoyment much, much longer.

Schooner American Eagle entering Bucks Harbor, South Brooksville, Maine

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Moby Monday: Frank Stella and Herman Melville by Peter A. Mello

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The Grand Rapids Museum of Art currently has an exhibition of a modern master who get inspiration from a literary classic: MOBY-DICK: Frank Stella and Herman Melville.

If you have never experienced Frank Stella’s monumental artworks you are missing out. His large three dimensional paintings/sculptures on twisted metal (stainless steel) in vivid colors are some of my favorite works of art.

From the Grand Rapids website:

From 1985 to 1997, leading American painter and printmaker, Frank Stella, created a major series of works linked to Melville’s classic Moby-Dick. He created one or more works for each of the novel’s 135 chapters. The completed series consists of 266 pieces: large metal reliefs, monumental sculptures, a mural, and an extended series of mixed-media prints.  The series that Stella named for Melville’s novel is his greatest sustained achievement in four decades of making art.

The exhibition MOBY-DICK: Frank Stella and Herman Melville brings together more than thirty monumental printed works from Stella’s series, including his definitive masterpiece, The Fountain. Twenty-four feet in length, The Fountain is Stella’s largest and most complex work on paper. The woodblocks with metal inlay plates for The Fountain are included in the exhibition on loan from The National Gallery of Australia. A preamble to the exhibition includes a group of Rockwell Kent’s ink-drawings for Moby-Dick and the original Lakeside edition of the book.

You can download the Grand Rapids Art Museum’s audiotour of the exhibition from the museum’s website and view a short video interview with the artist on Blip.tv.

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FotoFriday: New Bedford Whaling Museum by Peter A. Mello

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Visited the New Bedford Whaling Museum this afternoon for a quick run through the “Classic Whaling Prints” exhibit that opened today and snapped this cool diorama which is part of the show. If you can get there, check it out.

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Maritime Art: Reuben Margolin Making Waves by Peter A. Mello
February 1, 2009, 2:09 pm
Filed under: maritime art | Tags: ,

Reuben Margolin makes amazing kinetic sculptures that include among other things, waves. I highly encourage you to watch the below video in full screen mode because #1 it’s HD, #2 it demonstrates why Vimeo is one of the best online video services and #3 Margolin’s art work is very cool.

Thanks to cewhite via Twitter.

Technorati tags: , ,

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