Speak like a "Sea"E.O. (Wall Street Journal)

On December 31st, I posted about the NY Times 2007 Buzzwords article which included the phrase “Navy shower”. (Navy Shower: NY Times Buzzwords 2007)

For centuries nautical words have made their way ashore integrating themselves into our everyday language. You can hardly read a daily newspaper today without coming across a reference to a business experiencing “rough seas” or “smooth sailing,” a CEO being “thrown overboard” by directors or an unprofitable product line being “jettisoned.” You may have even felt “under the weather” or been “left high and dry?”

On February 1st, I wrote a post entitled Who’s the smartest maritime blogger of them all? which included the following:

Well, Yahoo is not the only Internet property experiencing “headwinds.” The Sea-Fever blog’s lack of ads or any other virtual or real revenue model has forced us to “tack” this project and chart a new course using the most powerful web 2.0 (aka free) tools available to finish this important work.

WSJlogoWhite Well, the front page of today’s Wall Street Journal (Feb. 11th) has latched on with an interesting article by Dionne Searcey entitled “Headwind” Blows as Top Executives Navigate Troubles (subscription required).

Coincidence? Or is this just another blatant case of main street media looking again to the maritime blogging community for inspiration. Hmmm, you be the judge.

In any case, it’s great when maritime culture makes the front pages of one of the most prestigious and widely read newspapers in the US. The Sea-Fever blog is pleased to help you spot these pop maritime culture trends and provide inspiration for big time media. ;-)

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Peter A. Mello

Husband, father, son. Lifelong mariner, student of leadership, photographer. Professional creative placemaker.

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