Foto Friday – Night Shift / Coast Guardsmen (NY Times Lens Series)

Lens CG by Michelle Agins for the NY Times
Boatswain's Mate Estrella, who was born in the Dominican Republic, works to protect the infrastructure and to assist in search and rescue operations. Photo: Michelle V. Agins/The New York Times

The above photograph is one of a series from a slideshow from the NY Times Lens Series.  From the City Room blog, Lens: Night Shift | Coast Guardsman:

Luis Estrella, 26, a boatswain’s mate third class, patrols the waters from the Staten Island Ferry to the Outerbridge Crossing to Newark Bay on a Marine Domain Awareness patrol, which involves a four-man crew that works two 12-hour shifts over 48 hours.

The patrols work in three areas — the upper Hudson River, Lower Manhattan and the Newark Bay area — to protect the infrastructure and to assist in search and rescue operations.

About the Lens Series:

For the past three months, Michelle V. Agins, a staff photographer for The Times, worked the night shift alongside them, patrolling New York Harbor for security breaches with the United States Coast Guard, presiding over the empty pews with the night watchman at the Marble Collegiate Church on Fifth Avenue at 29th Street, feeding infant twin boys with a baby nurse in Park Slope, riding an ambulance all over with emergency medical technicians. Here Gary Louhisdon, a security guard at the American Museum of Natural History, walks among the exhibits, much as Ben Stiller did in “Night at the Museum.”

Each week for the next three months, photographs will appear of other members of the city’s secret club that meets after midnight. Please, they asked, do not call it the graveyard shift. They are not dead.

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Foto Friday – ClydeSights

ClydeSights - STEN ODIN and Pipers

I love photography. I love the Internet. Put the two together and you’ve got something that rivals this.

One of the greatest things about it is the wide range of styles that you can experience. Some like our friend OneEighteen are artists behind the lens and others, like another good friend, Tugster, are comprehensive documentarians. ClydeSights falls in the latter category.

While Tugster’s backdrops are the manmade mountains of Manhattan, ClydeSights are god’s version in Scotland. The full blog title is ClydeSights – Contemporary local shipping on the Clyde and the website says:

The ClydeSighter is a shipping enthusiast, who spent several years at sea sailing around the world before taking up employment with a local company.
Just like when visiting with Tugster, I can find my self lost for hours checking out the ships that work The Clyde. These photographers do a wonderful job of capturing our maritime heritage for future generations. Check it out.