FotoFriday: Snow in the Searchlight

The above photo was taken by Captain Tim Ruttledge. Here’s what he wrote on his Flickr page which is a place the you should visit because he’s a talented photographer:

Snow storm off the coast of Utsira, Norway last night. The wind was blowing a gale into the bargain and we were rolling like a dog on wet grass, I fired up the starboard searchlight to check the main deck and saw a lot of wet snow flakes flying towards me, tried to catch the effect on a longish exposure.

Tim also has a great blog called Tim’s Times and you can read a little more about this photo there too.  Snow, storms and seasickness (December 25, 2009)

FotoFriday: Patrick Harris – The Boat Dweller

NYTimes One in 8 Million - Patrick Harris

The New York Times has a great multimedia series called One in 8 Million which features stunning black and white photography coupled with interesting audio interviews. This week Todd Heisler photographed and Tanzina Vega interviewed Captain Patrick Harris – The Boat Dweller.  Give a look and listen, it’s a nice piece about maritime life on the island of Manhattan.

FotoFriday: Elena Kalis’ Alice in Waterland

Today’s Wall Street Journal has an interesting article about children’s books currently being made for the big screen but not necessarily for their original audiences. (Kids’ Movies Grow Up Oct. 9, 2009) I’m really looking forward to seeing Spike Jonze’s version of Maurice Sendak’s Where the Wild Things Are which is opening next week.

Another wildly anticipated movie is Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland which is being remade by Tim Burton and starring, you guessed it, Jack Sparrow, Johnny Depp; that should be interesting! (website with trailer)

Elena Kalis is a very talented photographer who has her own take on this classic story with “Alice in Waterland.”

From Kalis’ website:

I was born in Moscow (Russia) and have lived for the past ten years on a small island in the Bahamas with my husband and two children. I have an education in art, but have recently been following my interest in photography. Over the past year I have been doing some underwater projects with my children and friends.

Check out all of her interesting images on her website, Facebook and Flickr sites.

FotoFriday: Old Man and the Sea

How is it possible that one of the greatest photographers of all time was sent to shoot one of the greatest American writers of all time in advance of a book that ended up selling over 5 million copies in 2 days and many of the photos remained hidden from the public view for 57 years?

The photographer: Alfred Eisenstaedt; the writer: Ernest Hemingway; the book: Old Man and the Sea; the setting: Cuba

Check out Life’s great slideshow (19 slides)

Report via Sea-Fever Twittersphere Correspondent Mia Chambers.

Hemingway - Life Sept 1 1952

Hemingway - Life cover Sept 1 1952

FotoFriday: Jenny Holzer’s “Wave T”

Jenny Holzer "Wave T" NY Times Style Magazine - Women's Fashion Fall 2009

Last Sunday the NY Times celebrated the 5th Anniversary Issue of it’s Style Magazine with the above image on the cover. Look closely and you’ll see the sea.

The cover was created by one of the art world’s most successful contemporary artists, Jenny Holzer. In reality the image was an art mashup with Holzer finding Cobalt123’s original image on Flickr. Here’s the story.

Holzer is an American conceptual art whose medium is language, or more precisely words. She uses words in all kinds of locations and ways including recently projecting them onto water like the below image from her interesting Projections website.

Jenny Holzer: Site: Tuxedo Princess, Gateshead, United Kingdom; October 27, 2000; Text: Lustmord - 1993-1995; Projection: Charles Paserelli; Photo: Attilio Maranzano

Here’s a video from Holzer’s recent show, Protect Protect, at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York.

[YouTube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8iHvW3JRQpY]
YouTube – Whitney Focus presents Jenny Holzer: PROTECT PROTECT

FotoFriday: Flickr Waterhousing Photography Group

"bailey-bs-tube-2" by Anthony Bevilacqua on Flickr.com

Sorry for the lack of posts but we’ve been away for our summer holiday in England.

Here’s a FotoFriday that should whet your appetite for some summer fun in the surf. The Flickr blog had a post today about the Waterhousing Photography Group. The above photo by Anthony Bevilaqua is just one of many, many amazing shots taken by photographer in or under the water. Check it out!

Technorati tags: , ,

FotoFriday: Fred LeBlanc’s Windjammers Downeast

Earlier this week I received a copy of Fred LeBlanc’s new mini-coffee table book, Windjammers Downeast as well as an accompanying set of beautiful photo postcards.

I met Fred when I was at the American Sail Training Association where he was always extremely generous with his images. He’s dedicated his work to helping promote this very unique fleet of tall ships that sail along the beautiful Maine coast.

So next time you are heading over to someone’s house for a summer dinner, you might want to skip the predictable bottle of wine and cut flowers and present them a copy of Windjammers Downeast; especially if they’re sailors or just love the sea. It’s about the same price and it’ll bring enjoyment much, much longer.

Schooner American Eagle entering Bucks Harbor, South Brooksville, Maine

Share this post :

FotoFriday: Keith Loutit’s Magical Maritime Moving Images

We’ve featured Keith Loutit’s amazing tilt-shift videography before (here and here). Here’s his latest work. Man, this guy makes maritime magic!

[Vimeo 5137183]

Share this post :

FotoFriday: Working Waterfront Portraits by Phillip Mello

Modesto Caril, Clam House Worker, New Bedford by Phil Mello 2008

The name in the title might look familiar and that’s because the artist is my cousin. Today the New Bedford Whaling Museum is opening a show of Phil’s amazing collection of photographic portraits of New Bedford commercial waterfront workers. From the museum’s website:

Working Waterfront, Photographic Portraits focuses on local shoreside workers and their jobs: from fish cutter to purveyor, from welder to auctioneer, from lumper to inspector, as well as fishermen. Each person, each job, is vital to the daily operation of supplying seafood to market. All photographs were taken by Phillip Mello, mostly using a Mamiya RZ 67 camera with Kodak BW400cn Professional film. They are part of a project he began early in 2008 and which continues today: to photograph the local fishing industry through the people who work in it. Mr. Mello knows these people and this place well, having worked on the waterfront for over thirty-four years, currently as plant manager at Bergie’s Seafood. His photographs benefit from this closeness, and we are fortunate to have had these doors opened.

There’s an opening reception this evening after the Whaling Museum’s Annual Meeting and before/during their very popular After Hours Friday night social event. But in case you can’t make the event or have trouble getting to the gallery anytime soon, you can experience Phil’s work via the Whaling Museum’s Flickr page.

Henrique Chiquito, clean-up man at a New Bedford Fish House by Phil Mello 2008

Phil is also the president of the New Bedford Port Society which owns and operate the Seamen’s Bethel, which first came to fame as the Whalemen’s Chapel in Herman Melville’s classic American novel Moby-Dick, as well as the historic Mariner’s Home.

Reproductions of photographs in the exhibit are available via the Whaling Museum’s photography department by contacting photoresearch@whalingmuseum.org. Proceeds from their sale will be split evenly between the Whaling Museum and the New Bedford Port Society.

 Dave and Jim Tomassia, fish lumpers, working in the fish hold by Phil Mello 2008

It’s an amazing body of work that celebrates the spirit of the people who work anonymously on New Bedford’s commercial waterfront everyday. Thanks to Michael Lapides, the New Bedford Whaling Museum’s Director of Digital Initiatives / Curator of Photography for giving the community the opportunity to get this inside look and for creating a historical document that captures an important part of New Bedford today. And thanks Phil, the Mello family is proud!

Make sure you check out the Whaling Museum’s blog, join their Facebook page and follow them on Twitter too!

Share this post :