FotoFriday: How to pay a pirate – part II

Remember we showed you how to pay a pirate to get back your $250,000,000 oil filled tanker? Well, it seems it take twice as many parachutes to get your cargo shipped filled with military equipment released. Here’s a picture taken by the US Navy via MarineBuzz via @oldsailor on Twitter.

CLICK FOR HI-REZ - 090204-N-3931M-427 INDIAN OCEAN (Feb. 4, 2009) Ransom money is dropped in the vicinity of the MV Faina off the coast of Somalia near Hobyo while under observation by a U.S. Navy ship. Pirates did not actually leave the ship until Feb. 5, more than 24 hours after this photo was taken. The Belize-flagged cargo ship is operated by Kaalbye Shipping Ukraine and is carrying a cargo of Ukranian T-72 tanks and related equipment. The ship was attacked Sept. 25, 2008 by pirates and forced to proceed to anchorage off the Somali Coast. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Michael R. McCormick/Released)

Photo on official US Navy website plus more photos.

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This is how you pay pirates to get back your supertanker

paying-pirates

Ever wonder how you’re going to pay those pirates that hijack your $250,000,000 supertanker? Drop them $3,000,000 in a parachute from a small plane. Hard to believe but true but they all got away. Here’s the story in the January 10, 2009 New York Times.

Some things never change, IF you believe this:

The pirate named Jama said he was waiting for his share of the ransom. “When the pirates receive the money, they will divide in shares on the spot, so that they will disembark tonight from the ship with everyone’s share in pocket,” he said.

More pictures.

Messing About In Ships podcast episode 31

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(49 minutes)

Download MP3: Messing About In Ships podcast episode 31

Subscribe Via iTunes HERE

Shownotes @ Messing About In Ships blog

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Pirates Invade Wall Street Journal!

Chad Crowe for the Wall St. Journal

Today’s (Nov. 19, 2008) Wall Street Journal has three first section articles/editorials about modern day pirates which might indicate that mainstream media is finally beginning to understand the serious nature of this international waterborne form of terrorism. Hijack a supertanker full of oil valued at over $100 million and you’re bound to attract attention. 

On page 12, JOHN W. MILLER wrote Piracy Spurs Threats to Shipping Costs (free content) Accompanying this article you’ll  find a slideshow, video and interactive graphics that shed more light on the problem.

On page 20, OpinionReview & Outlook you’ll find an editorial titled Pirates Delight – Other thugs will come if we don’t punish the Somali pirates

On page 21 OpinionDAVID B. RIVKIN JR. and LEE A. CASEY, two Washington, D.C. lawyers who served in the Justice Department under Presidents Reagan and George H.W. Bush wrote an editorial titled Pirates Exploit Confusion About International Law.

Additionally, JOSEPH SCHUMAN’S The Morning Brief (a look at the day’s biggest news which is emailed to subscribers by 7 a.m. every business day) dealt with the subject. Failed State: Pirate’s Life For Somalia, Shippers

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Back in April 2008, I wrote a post titled Modern Day Pirates: No Kidding Matter. Unfortunately, the problem has gotten a lot worse since and there’s no immediate solution in sight.

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The Good Pirate Brogan Charts a Social Media Course Over the Horizon

Chris Brogan logoMaster blogger and social media Commander Chris Brogan has hopped aboard the good ship of maritime metaphors in business with his recent post, The Beauty of Pirate Ships. This sighting was reported by lookout and Triiibes.com friend, Dawn Carter, who blogs over at Chronicles of Dawnia.

Okay, many Sea-Fever readers might not be comfortable with pirate metaphors but Chris ends his post with a Quick Disclaimer that he knows the history of pirates so don’t “crap” on his analogy. Agreed? Aye, aye! Anyway there are some good pirates out there right? Aye!

Swalllows and Amazons Forever If anyone reading this is not familiar with Chris’ work, get yourself underway and sail over to his blog. He has the incredible knack for taking business, marketing and social media concepts and simplifying them so that anyone can see the light. Like Seth Godin, he’s a masterful storyteller who entertains while he teaches. .

The point of his post that the beauty of pirate ships is that the ship (aka infrastructure) is much less important that what you do with it. Chris writes:

You see, they (pirates) weren’t as worried about the details of the operation and maintenance of their existing infrastructure. Instead, they had a fierce passion for their goal of acquiring a living from other vessels on the seas. How does this apply to what we/you do? This game is going to get crazy (has already become crazy). We need to focus harder on the goals than we do the infrastructure, the excuses, the labels, and everything else that gets between us and a goal.

He goes on to say:

This isn’t about chaos. It’s not about throwing everything away. It’s about knowing which parts are vital to moving through the waters, versus the pieces we keep around because that’s what we always did. I wouldn’t always advise something of this nature, and it’s not the right plan for everyone. But me? I’ve got the Jolly Rogers heading up the flag pole soon, and will fire all the guns as soon as my target is in sight.

The Good Pirate Brogan followed up with another briny post, Finding Treasure in the Comments. I’ll let yer scurvy dogs discover that one for yerfelves.

So take the Good Pirate’s advice and batten down the hatches, stow the anchor, point your nose to the wind, keep a steady hand on the tiller and sail toward your business goals full and by.

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Pirate PR

Pirate illustration by Kate O'Connor for the NY Times Over the past few years we have seen a surge of pirate activity across the globe with some of the highest profile incidents taking place off the coast of Somalia in Africa.

The one that has certainly secured the world’s attention involves the Russian ship MV Faina which is full of military equipment destined for Kenya. The ship is currently surrounded by navy warships and basically has nowhere to go. The pirates have demanded a ransom of $20million. The stand off continues as of this post.

NY Times reporter Jeffrey Gettleman was extremely resourceful in securing the pirates’ satellite phone number which he called and ultimately connected with the official spokespirate, Sugule Ali. Now the PR world is abuzz about Pirate PR. Here’s a few interesting articles.

Swashbuckler Has A Future on Wall Street – Virginia Pilot (Oct. 2, 2008)

But I Promised the Pirates’ Flack That I Wouldn’t Quote Anyone But Him! – Editor & Publisher (Oct. 2, 2008)

Pirates Reveal a New Side With Spokesperson – PR Week  (Oct. 1, 2008)

Pirates Have PR Pros, Too – PR Junkie – Ragan Communications (Oct. 1, 2008)

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