Tsumani at Sea (Japan Coast Guard video)

Translation:

  • 0:08 brace yourself guys, hold on tight.
  • 0:13 I have no idea what will happen to you if you are not holding on something.
  • 0:20 10 meter high, guys
  • 0:30 wowwwwwwwwwwwww
  • 0:38 good, we’ve just gone over it. the second wave is coming.
  • 0:43 this is bigger than the last one.
  • 0:50 Speed up, navigator!
  • 0:54 both screws at 20
  • 0:56 the fourth wave two miles ahead.
  • 1:13 now 1.6 miles ahead
  • 1:16 keep both screws at 20

Credit (and disclaimer): Video and translation via Russia Today on YouTube

Amazing Chilean Earthquake Tsunami Wave Energy Animation (via NOAA)

This post of NOAA’s Wave Energy Distribution Map (computer modeled) was a very popular Sea-Fever post over the weekend.

If you think that graphic was impressive, the below animation will definitely rock your boat.

Flag dip to Open Culture on Twitter.

The Tsunami: What Happened

Thankfully Hawaii was spared from the tsunami from the Chile earthquake this afternoon.

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But there seemed to be slightly more effect in Mexico.

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Finally, did you know that there was a 7.0 earthquake 50 miles off Japan yesterday that could have caused a pretty significant tsunami. I didn’t.

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Surviving a Tsunami: Lessons from Chile, Hawaii, and Japan (1960)(via USGS)

Hawaii Tsunami 1960 via USGS

Eerily useful, but potentially late, USGS reference as we await the arrival of a tsunami on the shores of Hawaii from the coast of Chile.  Great graphics and explanations about earthquakes and tsunamis.

Surviving a Tsunami—Lessons from Chile, Hawaii, and Japan compiled by Brian F. Atwater, Marco Cisternas V., Joanne Bourgeois, Walter C. Dudley, James W. Hendley II, and Peter H.Stauffer – 1999; Reprinted 2001; revised and reprinted 2005

Prepared in cooperation with Universidad Austral de Chile, the University of Tokyo, the University of Washington, the Geological Survey of Japan, and the Pacific Tsunami Museum